Tag Archives: Tintin And Me

A Week In Film #103: All hallows


Daylight Robbery
A British heist movie – if you believe ‘ITV At The Movies’. They think it’s the best since The Italian Job. It’s not.

Some good actors (eg Johnny Harris) and some less good actors (Barry from EastEnders) wasted in a poorly put together, pace-lacking, cheap-feeling crime thriller, which is criminally unthrilling. An interesting plot premise is squandered for lack of rhythm, half-hearted direction (Paris Leonte) and a baggy script. Paul Nicholls in the world’s cheapest looking fat suit does not make this worth your money.


The Crew
Another British gangster flick, this time adapted from Kevin Sampson’s novel ‘Outlaws’. Starts off interesting, very quickly goes shit. Scouse blaggers, fat drug dealer found dead, young bucks ready to fill the void, crime boss feels twin pulls of the gang and the family… Yawn.

Stephen Graham is excellent as the capo di tutti capi, but for the most part is neglected in favour of a dull soap opera involving brothers/half-brothers/step-brothers (or whatever) Scot Williams and Kenny Doughty. And a see-it-a-mile-off twist. And a halfway-interesting gay romance (actually, make that two romances). Phillip Olivier is very watchable. The ultraviolence moments and the army of ratboys are fascinating, but not fully explored, so seem more like moments of cheap thrills. Directed with some aplomb by Adrian Vitoria.


Tintin Et Moi
Rather well put together documentary about Tintin and the cartoonist who created him, Georges ‘HergĂ©’ Remi, constructed out of the interview tapes of Numa Sadoul, archive footage and modern talking heads.

Refreshingly when it comes to onscreen contributors, the accent is on tintinologists who know their material rather than rent-a-slebs. Good to see Harry Thompson, author of a rather good, critical-but-fond Hergé biography, frozen out by the custodians of the Tintin industry.


Black Snake Moan
Tennessean writer/director Craig Brewer pulls together a very interesting modern day fable set in the modern Deep South. Sam Jackson as a pissed off, cuckolded (black) sharecropper, who (long story) chains up slutty young (white) nymphette Christina Ricci after discovering her unconscious and bloodied on a quiet country road. And yet there is no racial side to this, no sexual violence, and at the heart of the movie is romance and love.

By no means perfect, but thoughtful, well-executed, interesting.