Tag Archives: Hot Fuzz

A Week In Film #445: Fullers

City Hall title screenCity Hall
An old faithful, with Harold Becker directing John Cusack, Al Pacino, Danny Aiello and Bridget Fonda against a backdrop of New York politicking and corruption. Never quite hits a proper climax, but enjoyable nonetheless, with a great score from Jerry Goldsmith, and strong writing from a bunch of New Yorkers (former Deputy Mayor Kenneth Lipper, mob-friendly journalist Nicholas Pileggi, Taxi Driver’s Paul Schrader, and Broadway playwright Bo Goldman).

Kuffs title screen
Kuffs
Silly stuff with Christian Slater doing his Jack Nicholson impersonation/mugging to camera thing as a slacker who visits San Francisco to see his brother Bruce Boxleitner, a private cop (under a peculiar Gold Rush-era ordinance), only for murder and shenanigans to occur. Milla Jovovich plays his girlfriend. Entirely disposable with nothing distinguishing about it.

Reasonable Doubt title screenReasonable Doubt
Up until a certain point, a quite enjoyable if inconsequential thriller, about a golden boy prosecutor (Dominic Cooper) who finds himself trying a man (Samuel L Jackson) accused of a crime he himself committed. That point will be obvious to you when you get there; it’s worth noting that Jackson is black, and Cooper white – this makes it all the more distasteful. Directed by Peter Howitt (yes, Joey from Bread, then the SAS officer in Some Mother’s Son, and after that the writer/director of Sliding Doors).

Alien: Covenant title screen
Alien: Covenant
It’s not an Alien(s) film, it’s a Prometheus sequel. Now, that film was not great, but it had visceral moments. This is just Ridley Scott shitting on his own legacy, rinsing audiences with callbacks to the xenomorph movies that he treats with such contempt. Michael Fassbender as synthetic human David, and now also Walter, is fine; and the crew of the terraforming ship Covenant does at least gel together more convincingly that that of its predecessor; but it’s like a Top Of the Pops LP, all reconstituted hits (Egg! Facehugger! Chestburster! Tunnel chase! Dropship through storm! Trying to set up comms! Powerloader fight! etc). Frankly, boring. I paid nearly £25 for two tix too!

White House Down title screenWhite House Down
Enjoyable Die Hard-style romp, with Channing Tatum as a recently-divorced blue collar shlub trying to repair his relationship with his daughter (Joey King) whilst trying his best to get a job in the Secret Service, who gets caught up in a terrorist attack on Washington. Roland Emmerich directs with a sense of humour and fun, and in all areas it’s a superior effort to the similarly themed Olympus Has Fallen.Nice turns from Jason Clarke, James Woods, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Jamie Foxx and Kevin Rankin.

Hot Fuzz title screenHot Fuzz
Edgar Wright directs his old Spaced pals Simon Pegg and Nick Frost in the second of the ‘Three Cornettos’ trilogy – here with a metropolitan super-cop (Pegg) sent to sleepy Cotswold town Sandford, where he soon encounters rum happenings. Great cast of older British character actors (Edward Woodward, Billie Whitelaw, Jim Broadbent, Paul Freeman, Timothy Dalton, Kenneth Cranham, Stuart Wilson, Anne Reid), plus younger upstarts (Paddy Considine, Rafe Spall, Olivia Colman, Rory McCann) and Wright stalwarts like Julia Deakin, Bill Bailey and Bill Nighy. Silly, slightly overlong, but fun.

Yojimbo title screen用心棒 AKA Yojimbo
Kurosawa’s tale of a ronin-with-no-name (Toshiro Mifune) arriving in a town beset by two feuding gangs who sees an angle. Great samurai action interspersed with comedy and tragedy.

Jack Reacher title screenJack Reacher
So-so noir-flecked action adventure, with Tom Cruise as a mysterious ex-Military Policeman digging around into a spree killing in Pennsylvania apparently carried out by a soldier he had previously investigated for similar sniper murders in Iraq. Hardly ground-breaking, but with plenty going on. Director Chris McQuarrie throws in some signature long dialogue scenes, an argument outside a bar and a grumpy old man (here Robert Duvall). With Rosamund Pike, David Oyelowo, Richard Jenkins and Werner Herzog.

Enemy At The Gates title screenEnemy At The Gates
Visually impressive, this is basically just a love triangle (Jude Law, Rachel Weisz and Joseph Fiennes) played against the backdrop of the Battle of Stalingrad, with Bob Hoskins in fake bad teeth as uncouth Party apparatchik Khruschev. Looks pretty, but Jean-Jacques Annaud doesn’t seem to have much to say about anything.

Brooklyn’s Finest title screen
Brooklyn’s Finest
Antoine Fuqua attempts a Robert Altman/Thomas Anderson-style intercut lives affair, with Ethan Hawke, Don Cheadle and Richard Were a trio of differently burned-out NYPD cops who are heading for a collision on Brooklyn’s most dangerous streets. Watchable if not memorable.

A Week In Film #220: Ich bin ein Berliner

Das Leben Der Anderen title screen

Das Leben Der Anderen AKA The Lives Of Others
Straight arrow Stasi investigator questions his work when ordered to investigate a target so that his boss can has a clear run up at the target’s girlfriend. Moving, powerful, emotionally manipulative, and at times funny.

Seven Psychopaths title screen

Seven Psychopaths
Amusing meta darkness from Martin McDonagh, in a similar vein as Macy’s The Deal, Kiss Kiss Bang Bang or Get Shorty, with blocked scriptwriter Coin Farrell getting into all sorts of weird trouble along with his impetuous chum Sam Rockwell.

Hot Fuzz title screen

Hot Fuzz
Wright & Pegg do the buddy cop movie, West Country-style.

A Week In Film #037: Overloaded

Monsters, Inc.
Rather fine Pixar/Disney animated feature about a pair of misfit monsters (Billy Crystal & John Goodman) on a quest.

The First Great Train Robbery title screen

The First Great Train Robbery
Another favourite, with Sean Connery, Donald Sutherland and Lesley Ann Warren as a team of Victorian crooks planning the ultimate heist. Michael Crichton directs this adaptation of his own book with brio, and there’s Jerry Goldsmith’s best score ever.

The Transporter title screen

The Transporter
The Stath as an ex-special forces type turned courier-for-hire who breaks his own rules and gets involved with some seriously bad people. Not cerebral, but thoroughly entertaining. The oil slick fight is superb. Co-directors Corey Yuen and Louis Leterrier keep things moving at a decent lick, and there’s engaging support from Shu Qi and François Berléand.

Alien title screen

Alien
Haunted house in space, Sigourney Weaver, xenomorph, etc. Classic stuff.

Aliens title screen

Aliens
Marines in space, Sigourney Weaver, xenomorphs, etc. Classic stuff.

Alien 3 title screen

Alien 3
Convicts in space, Sigourney Weaver, xenomorphs, etc. Flawed stuff.

Alien Resurrection title screen

Alien Resurrection
Pirates in space, Sigourney Weaver, xenomorphs, etc. Fucking awful stuff. Joss Whedon bow your head in shame. I paid to see this at the picture palace, too. Not impressed.

44 Minutes: The North Hollywood Shoot-Out title screen

44 Minutes: The North Hollywood Shoot-Out
Very slick, very well made TVM about a real-life bank heist, with Michael Madsen leading a solid cast. Better than most big screen efforts.

The Rules Of Attraction title screen

The Rules Of Attraction
Roger Avery’s Bret Easton Ellis college novel adaptation, very unpleasant, very good. The dude from Dawson’s Creek is in it.

Banlieue13 title screen

Banlieue 13
Trés bon silliness set in a near future dystopia where les banlieues are used as a prison to keep les sans culottes in their place. David Belle as the ghetto idealist and Cyril Raffaelli as the cop he teams up with are a good pairing, and the action sequences show off their respective disciplines (parkour & martial arts) to the fullest effect. Pierre Morel directs with skill from Luc Besson’s paper-thin script, and it looks amazing.

Hot Fuzz
Enjoyable cop-based retread of the Simon Pegg/Edgar Wright/Nick Frost relationship, with almost too many familiar faces.

Sunshine title screen

Sunshine
I really liked this Danny Boyle/Alex Garland SF number, about a space mission to save the Earth, but it seems I’m in a minority. I like the way it slowly unfolds, I like the tension, I like the unlikeableness of many of the characters, I like the sound design and the visual structure, I like the cast.

The Dark Crystal
Very disappointing Muppet-based sword-and-sorcery nonsense. Nowhere near Labyrinth in quality.

Layer Cake
Matthew Vaughn handles his material with confidence first time out the traps as a director in an adaptation of a novel about a nameless coke dealer and the scrapes he gets into. From this he somehow manages to make a well-polished and engaging little picture in which older character actors are given a chance to shine – Colm Meaney, Kenneth Cranham, George Harris, Michael Gambon. Oh, and it’s blatantly Daniel Craig’s 007 calling card.

The Killer Elite
Dull, uninspiring lesser Peckinpah, with James Caan and Robert Duvall as a pair of US proxy spooks who end up on opposite sides. There’s no energy in it, and the fight scenes are amongst the worst I’ve ever seen. An interesting premise wasted.

Heat title screen

Heat
Michael Mann does cops and robbers in LA with Pacino and De Niro, and Andy McNab choreographing the mesmerising post-heist shoot-out.

Serpico title screen

Serpico
Al Pacino as the cop who wouldn’t be bought, but could be shot. One of Sidney Lumet’s best pictures, and Pacino’s too, and with no happy ending. A classic New York film.

Nid De Guêpes title screen

Nid De Guêpes
Florent Emilio Siri takes Assault On Precinct 13 as his starting point and turns in a film far more stylish than anything Hollywood has produced in a long time. Four groups collide on an industrial estate outside Strasbourg on Bastille Day – a gang of burglars, a group of security guards, a multinational anti-terrorist team, and a massive and heavily armed band of Albanian bandits. If you’ve not seen it, and you like action pictures, seek it out. A strong cast includes Samy Naceri, Benoît Magimel, Nadia Farès, Pascal Greggory, Sami Bouajila, Anisia Uzeyman, Richard Sammel, Valerio Mastandrea and Martial Odone.

Porky's Revenge title screen

Porky’s Revenge
Third film in a franchise that lasted at least two films beyond its natural life. I have nothing of note to say, a bit like the film itself.

Thunderheart title screen

Thunderheart
Michael Apted directs Val Kilmer in a barely-fictionalised account of the US war with modern American Indian society, based on the Pine Ridge siege. Think of it as a superior version of Mississippi Burning, in which the FBI aren’t whitewashed into heroes.